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Compacted Graphite Cast Iron…its Properties and Production with a New Alloy (20082684)
Modern Casting July 1976 P50-52
The unique combination of properties offered by compacted graphite cast iron gives the iron potential in a variety of applications. Frequently mentioned castings include components for the automotive, truck and farm implement industries such as brake drums, exhaust manifolds, engine blocks, heads and valve bodies. The potential of compacted graphite cast iron for ingot mold castings is also an area of particular interest. The difficult nature of process controls have, in the past, limited the success of compacted graphite irons. Current efforts with anew Mg-Ti-Ce-Ca ferrosilicon alloy have, however, shown a marked degree of initial success in several foundries.

SAMPLING FOR THE SPECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF GRAY AND DUCTILE CAST IRON (19840547)
Transactions of the American Foundrymen's Society V 91 Paper 83-185 P 799-806, 1983 (8 pages)
The authors review the degree to which results of vacuum emission spectrometry are affected by the nature of the sample's microstructure. Various sample molds are reviewed and differences in spectrometry results relating to each type are presented. While certain types emerge as preferable, there appears to be no simple answer to this problem. Of interest is the ranking of sample molds from worst to best changes when magnesium is included in the elements considered. Generally speaking, samples produced in sample copper molds were consistently the worst.

SIGNIFICANCE OF REPORTED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF CAST IRON (3057)
Transactions of the American Foundrymen's Society V 67 P 705-714, 1959 (10 p)
Chemical analysis data, reported by more than 30 laboratories for 40 samples of cast iron over a period of 15 years, indicate that limits for accuracy and reproducibility are greater than commonly assumed. Good reproducibility of analyses by a laboratory does not necessarily imply good accuracy. Accuracy of analysis can be best determined by submitting the same sample of iron to at least six laboratories for analysis. The range for reported analyses from a large group of laboratories will be about three times as great as that obtained by one laboratory for the same sample of iron. The existence of this somewhat broad range for reported analysis of cast iron in the literature must be recognized when evaluating the relationship of chemical composition of cast iron to its mechanical and physical properties. Causes for some of the variations in accuracy of analyses are explained.

PENETRATION AND SHRINKAGE BY INTERACTION OF SOLIDIFYING CAST IRON AND THE CASTING MOLD (19730711)
39th IFC May 1972 Paper No. 8 AFS Cast Metals Research Journal (June 1973), p. 56-63
Tests made with a centrally-cored cylindrical casting have shown the practical consequences of expansion accompanying the eutectic solidification of cast iron. A surplus of liquid iron in the casting causes metal penetration into the central core, whereas metal shortage is recognizable by the presence of shrinkage defects in the casting. In these cases, the castings under study showed a sol-called "under-expansion" and "over-expansion", respectively. The type of expansion which occurs is controlled by the interaction between solidifying cast iron and the mold. Factors which promote shrinkage and decrease the tendency toward penetration are: the formation of graphite in spheroidal form, the presence of P and Mo in the iron, inoculation of the iron melt, an unstable mold wall, a convex casting shape. The amount of eutectic graphite present may act either way, depending on the type of expansion occurring. An increase in the amount of eutectic graphite promotes penetration in the case of under-expansion etc.

RESEARCH INTO THE ANTI-FRICTION PROPERTIES OF CAST IRON Ts-1 AND BRONZES OF 10-1 and OTsS-6--6-3 (19690178)

Experiments on the anti-friction properties of cast iron Ts- 1 and bronzes OTsS-6-6-3 and OF-10-1 have shown that: The wear, as expressed by weight, of both cast iron and bronze test pieces, becomes stabilized after a period of time. The amounts of wear determined on the bronze and cast iron samples do not differ from those given in the literature. The grades of bronze tested are, in absolute values of wear, no worse than those of imported bronze containing 14% in. There is no significant increase in wear as the specific load on the test pieces is increased. The hardness of the mated test piece has a more significant influence on wear (the test was carried out using cast iron samples). The wear of cast iron test pieces was not altered when the mated steel test pieces contained 1% Cr (steel grade 40 Kh). The coefficients of friction and wear intensity fall with an increase in specific load on the sample.

INFLUENCE OF TITANIUM ON THE PROPERTIES OF CAST IRON (119)
Journal of the American Foundrymen's Association V 10 P 45-54, 1901 (10 p)

CAST IRON (143)
Journal of the American Foundrymen's Association V 11 P 61-68, 1902 (8 p)

NOTES ON MALLEABLE CAST IRON (21)
Journal of the American Foundrymen's Association V 2 P 518-521, 1897 (4 p)

DIFFICULTIES ENCOUNTERED IN TESTING CAST IRON (48)
Journal of the American Foundrymen's Association V 4 P 287-297, 1898 (11 p)

NOTES ON THE MICRO-STRUCTURE OF CAST IRON (169)
Journal of the American Foundrymen's Association V 12 P 95-102, 1903 (8 p)

1–10 of about 6990 matches for cast iron
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