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1–10 of about 218 matches for energy plant engineering
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ECONOMICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF CHEMICAL ABSORPTION ON THE REMOVAL OF SMOKE AND ODOR FROM VARIOUS COREMAKING, POURING, COOLING AND SHAKEOUT OPERATIONS (19750818)
AFS Transactions 1975 p. 401-404 Available as Preprint No. 75-30 @ $3.00
The author designed a chemical absorption system for a production foundry, and has been evaluating its effectiveness and economics for phenolic urethane cold box and phenolic siocyanate nobake coremaking, phenolic urethan cold box and phenolic isocyanate nobake mold pouring and cooling emissions. The paper shows initial odor units, final odor units, various chemical efficiencies, economics of system modifications, estimated capital investment and operating costs.

2005 FOUNDRY OF THE YEAR ├╗ HAYES LEMMERZ MONTAGUE (20061825)
Modern Casting V 95 N 7 P 18-22, Jul 2005 (5 p)
Hayes Lemmerz (Montague, Mich.) produces automotive suspension components in A356 using a Hayes Lemmerz developed vacuum and pressure assisted permanent molding process. This process has enabled them to produce high-quality aluminum crossmembers, steering knuckles and control arms. Robots are used extensively in the newer cells. The 1,500-lb. reverberatory casting furnaces are supplied with molten aluminum from two 14,000 lb/hr reverberatory furnaces that feed a covered launder system that runs the length of various permanent mold casting systems. Numerous pictures are included in the article and details of the vacuum-pressure casting process are also provided in the article.

Metalcaster of the Year: U.S. Pipe Turns on Tradition (20100200)
Modern Casting, Vol. 100, No.7, P16-21, July 2010
U.S. Pipe engineered a new kind of ductile iron pipe facility and now is taking the plant to even greater heights.

WE MIX, NOT MULL (19740816)
AFS Transactions 1974, p. 369-372
While it is the opinion of the writer that mixes are coming into their own, investigations and visits to foundries indicate that all too often the principal problem in reaching the decision to purchase sand tempering equipment has not been the type of mixer or muller involved. Selection has usually been made to conform to existing load requirements with very little thought given to expansion. It is relatively easy, within reason, to increase the capacity of any other part of the sand system but not the mixer or muller. In the case of the counter-current intensive mixer, a flange has been left in the mixer to take a second 180 hp high speed rotor which will shorten the batch cycle and, therefore, increase the throughput.

MICROWAVE ENERGY IN THE FOUNDRY (19690719)
AFS Transactions (1969) p. 141-145, MODERN CASTING (August 1969) p. 141-145
Microwaves are very short electromagnetic waves that fall in the same general classification of high frequency radiation used in radio, television, and radar. Microwaves lie between radio frequencies and infrared rays. In the microwave core process the energy is transferred directly to the core and heat generated within the core by molecular friction. The microwave energy heats the entire core from surface to center at the same time, without having to heat ambient air, oven walls, or conveyors. The rate of heating the cores is dependent upon the frequency of the microwave field and the permittivity and loss properties of the material being heated. Microwave during and drying of cores is accomplished in about 1/10 the time required for conventional methods. Smaller ovens are required, using less space. Fewer core driers are needed; 100 will do the work of 1,000. There is less heat and smoke from the core room. Other advantages anticipated are: Improved core dimensions, Reduced labor and Equipment costs.

A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO CUPOLA EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEMS (19780898)
AFS Transactions 1978, p. 237-240 Available as Preprint No. 78-74 @$3.00
Because most moderate size jobbing and production foundries do not have plant engineering staffs, they must seek help elsewhere. This paper covers the basic requirements of emission control equipment on cupolas. The various types that are available are discussed in sufficient detail to enable the foundry to acquire a better understanding of what is required. The high energy scrubber (wet) is described in detail. Emphasis is placed on the training of operating and maintenance personnel.

EXPERIMENTAL APPLICATION OF A HIGH VELOCITY COMBUSTION SYSTEM ON A DOUBLE CHAMBER DRY HEARTH REVERBERATORY ALUMINUM FURNACE (19840545)
Transactions of the American Foundrymen's Society V 91 Paper 83-172 P 815-820, 1983 (6 pages)
Targeted at a reduction of energy costs, a high velocity (forced convection) combustion chamber was constructed to evaluate its effect on fuel consumption in melting aluminum 356 alloy. The furnace alterations are shown in line drawings and photos and detailed schematics show the combustion system control circuits and components. Basically, this 1500 lb/hr. furnace showed a fuel savings of 40% average (percentage increases as furnace approaches maximum capacity) after the high velocity combustion system was installed. The high velocity burner sizes is reduced due to the forced convection characteristics.

FOUNDRY NOISE AND ITS CONTROL (2393)
Transactions of the American Foundrymen's Society V 61 P 694-700, 1953 (7 p)
The growing interest of management in industrial noise problems is brought about by the prospect that loss of hearing among workers exposed to excessive noise may be considered compensable in certain states. It is not the purpose of this paper to discuss the legal aspects of this problem, but rather to review some of the technical factors of industrial noise exposures and their control in the foundry and other industries, and also to discuss briefly the background leading to our present problems, the plans which are being formu lated for their solution and certain practical approaches to noise control. It is important, therefore, that all of the unknown factors relating to this problem should be classified.

PRACTICAL GUIDELINES FOR CONTROLLING FOUNDRY NOISE (19750717)
AFS Transactions 1975, p. 379-384 Available as Preprint No. 75-47 @ $3.00
This paper shows the practicality of the systems approach to noise reduction in the foundry industry. The necessity for both the theoretical and practical aspects of noise control that will be totally compatible with a plant operation is demonstrated. Descriptive information regarding typical noise centers in the foundry industry is discussed. These general areas are: molding areas, melting process areas, melting process areas, cope and drag handling shakeout vibratory conveying areas, finishing areas, ventilation and dust handling equipment areas and metal- to-metal contact locations. The sequential measuring methods are covered emphasizing the data needed to achieve a total as well as practical solution to the required noise abatement for the particular facility being studied.

Becoming a Practical Green Casting Industry (20110120)
Modern Casting, Vol. 101, No. 4, P38-41, April 2011
"As metal recyclers, metalcasting facilties have long considered themselves a part of the green movement. In reality, the industry has only scratched the surface and has yet to achieve the higher level of sustainability that the future will demand. Metalcasting is energy intensive, handles massive quantities of processed waste materials often destined for landfills and has the potential to emit a large quantity of carbon dioxide and other pollutants into the atmosphere. ThyssenKrupp Waupaca's president relates strategies for going green."

1–10 of about 218 matches for energy plant engineering
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