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1–10 of about 989 matches for metallurgy
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THE METALLURGY OF THE CUPOLA (142)
Journal of the American Foundrymen's Association V 11 P 49-59, 1902 (11 p)

FOUNDRY METALLURGY (123)
Journal of the American Foundrymen's Association V 10 P 87-98, 1901 (12 p)

MEMORANDA ON THE METALLURGY OF CAST IRON (183)
Transaction of the American Foundrymen's Association V 13 P A13-A14, 1904 (2 p)

METALLURGY OF CAST IRON AS RELATED TO THE MELTING PROCESS (19731023)
Available as Modern Casting Tech. Report No. 7313, $3.00
An effort is made to show that graphite contained in the metallic charge materials has an effect on chill value and on nucleation as expressed by the eutectic cell count. A sharp distinction is drawn between cupola melting, where this graphite is controlled by the selection of the original charge material and electric melting, where graphite nucleating effect i controlled by manipulating of the superheat temperature of the bath. It is demonstrated that the chill value in electric melting can change very rapidly, so that close control of superheat temperature becomes mandatory. Electric melting involves sufficient superheat to dissolve all graphite and eliminate its nucleating effect, but, at the same time, insufficient superheat to result in severe chill increase.

CARBORUNDUM REFRACTORIES IN NONFERROUS METALLURGY (754)
Transactions of the American Foundrymen's Association V 29 P 524-530, 1920 (7 p)

CRANE'S NEW FOUNDRY PUTS NEW PRECISION INTO MELTING METALLURGY (19690759)
Modern Casting (August 1969) p. 63-65
The article discusses a new foundry that uses the latest and most modern of automatic casting capabilities and techniques. Charge makeup accuracy is the important step toward quality metal. two terms used are "tare" and "clear". In this electronic system, "tare" sets the system readout to a reference ZERO. "Clear" is an incremental ZERO that allows the system to display and work toward the desired weight of each material. At the control panel, the melter presets the desired weight and loading tolerance in the charge makeup. If one or more of the six materials this system can handle will not be used in a charge, its control can be bypassed with a use/skip switch. After the charge requirements are set into the control panel, the melter presses the charge start button. This causes the system to tare the loading platform selected, and retare after the crane operator sets the charging bucket on it, after first printing the bucket's weight. The system then steps to the first material. The scoreboard automatically displays the material number and its desired weight preceded by a minus sign. As the crane operator loads the charging bucket, the scoreboard display decreases toward zero. The display always shows the amount of material short (minus) or over (plus) the desired weight.

THE METALLURGY OF MALLEABILIZATION (1201)
Transactions of the American Foundrymen's Association V 40 P 88-117, 1932 (30 p)

DEVELOPMENT OF FOUNDRY COURSES IN HIGH AND TRADE SCHOOLS (2188)
Transactions of the American Foundrymen's Society V 59 P 332-335, 1951 (4 p)
What does industry expect from the trade and high schools? What do the schools expect from industry? Answers to these questions will greatly aid in development of foundry courses. The pattern shop should also be considered since the two are insepar able. Not knowing exactly what industry expects, the schools develop a "tide program" one that rises and falls with the interest of the individual instructor. helped or hindered by the type of support received from industry. The following story will illustrate the point. A foundryman told the writer that his son was to enter a certain school and that he took time off to visit the foundry teacher, wishing to see the equip ment and the course of study. This plant owner was incensed over the fact that the instructor had other duties and did not have time to spend with him in the school foundry. He remarked, "Imagine a found ry instructor having to help coach the team." After questioning he informed the writer that that was his first visit to the school.

COMPUTERIZED SANDOLOGY FOR INSTANT SAND CONTROL (19700240)
Modern Casting (March 1970), p. 131-133
It soon became apparent that the first barrier to computerized control of sand was the inability to reproduce sand tests accurately from test to test--proving out the old adage that one cannot control accurately until one can measure accurately and consistently. Sandology, the science of sand, appears to be far more complex than that of metallurgy in that the following tests must be made daily in order to control sand to metallurgy in that the following tests must be made daily in order to control sand to rigid performance: moisture, compactability, permeability, green compression strength, splitting strength and percent clay as measured with methylene blue. The AFS clay content, AFS grain fineness, combustibles and volatiles should be checked at least weekly. The greatest problem in sand control is being able to relate the interaction of these various sand properties when considered as a total concept. The computer has the ability to deal simultaneously with these variables in a molding sand mix. Here is how it works. Stored in the memory bank of a time sharing computer is a large mass of comparative data that directly applies to all foundry sand operations. This is the basic mix formulations and the structural properties which best suit their particular operations. A central computer control center is used to store all this data and made available on a time sharing basis. A remote keyboard terminal is located at each foundry using the system.

THE Fe-C-Si SOLIDIFICATION DIAGRAM FOR CAST IRONS (19860885)
Trans American Foundrymen's Society V 94 Paper 86-71,1986
An FeCSi diagram for cast irons for both the stable Fe graphite and metastable Fe iron carbide solidification processes and the transition between the two is presented. Equations marking the boundaries of proeutectic and eutectic solidification are provided for both metastable and stable types. Diagrams for both systems are shown graphically. The diagram is presented as a solidification diagram and not as a ternary phase diagram, since it is derived from cooling curve data. It does not indicate the beginning and ending of solidification processes and involved multicomponent alloys. It is constructed on rectangular coordinates. Nevertheless, the diagram is most useful in cast iron metallurgy.

1–10 of about 989 matches for metallurgy
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